The rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine. Catherine Bates 2019-02-17

The rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine Rating: 5,8/10 389 reviews

British Library EThOS: Courtship and courtliness : studies in Elizabethan courtly language and literature

the rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine

In the sixteenth century the modern meaning of courtship - 'wooing someone' - developed from an older sense - 'being at court'. The Rhetoric of Courtship takes this semantic shift as the starting point for an incisive account of the practice and meanings of courtship at the court of Elizabeth I, where 'being at court' pre-eminently came to mean the same as 'wooing' the Queen. The book immerses readers in non-dramatic poetry from Wyatt to Milton, focusing on the key poetic genres—epic, lyric, complaint, elegy, epistle, pastoral, satire, and religious poetry. Gascoigne, Lyly, Sidney, Leicester, Essex, and Spenser are shown to reflect in the fictional courtships of their poetry and prose the vulnerabilities of court life that were created by the system of patronage. In the sixteenth century the modern meaning of courtship - 'wooing someone' - developed from an older sense - 'being at court'.

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The Rhetoric of Courtship in Elizabethan Language and Literature

the rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine

This study examines the shift in meaning of the words courtship and to court, seeking the origins of courtship in court society, with particular reference to the court and literature of the Elizabethan period. She specializes in sixteenth-century English literature: in particular, courtly forms such as epic, lyric, and romance. In its current sense, courting means 'wooing'; but its original meaning was 'residing at court'. The amorous sense of the word developed from a purely social sense in most major European languages around the turn of the sixteenth century, a time when, according to some historians, Western states were gradually moving toward the genesis of absolutism and the establishment of courts as symbols and agents of centralised monarchical power. Finally, it offers examples of current developments in the interpretation of Renaissance poetry, including economic, ecological, scientific, materialist, and formalist approaches. A Companion to Renaissance Poetry analyzes the historical, cultural, political, and religious background of the time, addressing issues such as education, translation, the Reformation, theorizations of poetry, and more. The Rhetoric of Courtship takes this semantic shift as the starting point for an incisive account of the practice and meanings of courtship at the court of Elizabeth I, where 'being at court' pre-eminently came to mean the same as 'wooing' the Que In the sixteenth century the modern meaning of courtship - 'wooing someone' - developed from an older sense - 'being at court'.

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The Rhetoric of Courtship in Elizabethan Language and Literature

the rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine

The most comprehensive collection of essays on Renaissance poetry on the market Covering the period 1520—1680, A Companion to Renaissance Poetry offers 46 essays which present an in-depth account of the context, production, and interpretation of early modern British poetry. Subject: Authors and patrons -- England -- History -- 19th century. Chapter 2 conducts a lexical study of the semantic change of the verb to court in French, Italian, and English, with an extended synchronic analysis of the word in Elizabethan literature. It provides students with a deep appreciation for, and sensitivity toward, the ways in which poets of the period understood and fashioned a distinctly vernacular voice, while engaging them with some of the debates and departures that are currently animating the discipline. Subject: Great britain Subject: Courtly love in literature Subject: English literature -- Early modern, 1500-1700.

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Catherine Bates

the rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine

The study concludes with a brief appraisal of Spenser's Amoretti as a model for the kind of courtship that has been under review. The book contributes to much revisionary work that is currently being done on Renaissance cultural history, drawing on social anthropology, philology and literary criticism. It also offers an inclusive account of the poetic production of the period by canonical and less canonical writers, female and male. These writers exploited the structural and semantic ambivalence of courtship in order to rehearse alternative experiences of failure and success, producing richly polyvalent and complex texts in which often conflicting strategies and devices are seen to compete and overlap with each other. This project explores the multiple delinquencies of Philip Sidney's multi-versioned romance, the Arcadia c. Subject: English language Subject: Courtship in literature Subject: Courts and courtiers in literature. It considers how a group of writers and courtiers Gascoigne, Lyly, Sidney, Leicester, Essex and Spenser related to the Queen within a system of patronage, and how they portrayed these relationships in the fictional courtships of their poetry and prose.

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The Rhetoric of Courtship in Elizabethan Language and Literature by Catherine Bates

the rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine

The rhetoric of courtship thus makes an important contribution to Renaissance cultural history, exploring the multiple meanings of 'courtship' in the sixteenth century, and using the court of Elizabeth I as a test case for representations of the courtier's role and power in the literature of the period. Courtship at court: some pageants and entertainments at the court of Elizabeth I; 4. Exploring the wider context of social anthropology, philology, cultural and literary history, Catherine Bates presents courtship as a judicious, sensitive and rhetorically conscious understanding of public and private relations. Exploring the wider context of social anthropology, philology, cultural and literary history, Catherine Bates presents courtship as a judicious, sensitive and rhetorically conscious understanding of public and private relations. The Rhetoric of Courtship thus makes an important contribution to Renaissance cultural history, using the court of Elizabeth I as a test case for representations of the courtier's role and power in the literature of the period. The semantics of courtship -- 3.

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Catherine Bates

the rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine

She is at work on a book entitled Perversion in Arcadia. Subject: English literature Subject: English literature - Early modern, 1500- Subject: Great Britain Court and courtiers History 16th century. Catherine Bates is a Professor of Renaissance Literature at the University of Warwick. Chapter 4 then moves away from the distinction between humanist and courtly concerns, to examine the practice of courtship at the court of Elizabeth I. The Rhetoric of Courtship takes this semantic shift as the starting point for an incisive account of the practice and meanings of courtship at the court of Elizabeth I, where 'being at court' pre-eminently came to mean the same as 'wooing' the Queen. The semantics of courtship; 3. Book Description The Rhetoric of Courtship is about the literature of the Elizabethan period with a particular focus on the literature of the court.

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The Rhetoric of Courtship in Elizabethan Language and Literature: Bates, Catherine and Catherine, Bates: Hardcover: 9780521414807: Powell's Books

the rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine

Subject: English literature -- Early modern, 1500-1700 -- History and criticism. Catherine Bates is Research Professor in the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies at the University of Warwick. This book considers how writers and courtiers related to Elizabeth I within a system of patronage and how they portrayed this relationship in fictional courtship of poetry and prose. It focuses on allegorical representations of Desire in courtly pageants, and suggests that the ambiguities inherent in the 'legitimised' Desire of Elizabethan shows exemplify the situation of poets and courtiers who found themselves at the court of a female sovereign. The Rhetoric of Courtship takes this semantic shift as the starting point for an incisive account of the practice and meanings of courtship at the court of Elizabeth I, where 'being at court' pre-eminently came to mean the same as 'wooing' the Queen.

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The Rhetoric of Courtship in Elizabethan Language and Literature: Bates, Catherine and Catherine, Bates: Hardcover: 9780521414807: Powell's Books

the rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine

The rhetoric of courtship: an introduction; 2. She is also currently editing the Blackwell Companion to Renaissance Poetry. Gascoigne, Lyly, Sidney, Leicester, Essex, and Spenser are shown to reflect in the fictional courtships of their poetry and prose the vulnerabilities of court life that were created by the system of patronage. This book considers how writers and courtiers related to Elizabeth I within a system of patronage and how they portrayed this relationship in fictional courtship of poetry and prose. Recent studies have questioned the quasi- Marxist notion that the amorous practices of the court and the 'bourgeois' ideals of harmonious, fruitful marriage were antithetical, and this thesis examines whether the development of 'romantic love' has a courtly as well as a bourgeois provenance. Synopsis The Rhetoric of Courtship is about the literature of the Elizabethan period with a particular focus on the literature of the court. The rhetoric of courtship: an introduction -- 2.

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Buy The Rhetoric of Courtship in Elizabethan Language and Literature Book Online at Low Prices in India

the rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine

The Rhetoric of Courtship thus makes an important contribution to Renaissance cultural history, using the court of Elizabeth I as a test case for representations of the courtier's role and power in the literature of the period. Description List of illustrations; Acknowledgements; Prologue; 1. . In the sixteenth century the modern meaning of courtship - 'wooing someone' - developed from an older sense - 'being at court'. Chapter 3 goes on to diversify the functional classification required by semantic analysis and considers the implications of courtship as a social, literary and rhetorical act in the works of Lyly and Sidney.

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A Companion to Renaissance Poetry

the rhetoric of courtship in elizabethan language and literature bates catherine

The Rhetoric of Courtship thus makes an important contribution to Renaissance cultural history, using the court of Elizabeth I as a test case for representations of the courtier's role and power in the literature of the period. Courtship at court: some pageants and entertainments at the court of Elizabeth I -- 4. The E-mail message field is required. Gascoigne, Lyly, Sidney, Leicester, Essex, and Spenser are shown to reflect in the fictional courtships of their poetry and prose the vulnerabilities of court life that were created by the system of patronage. Subject: Authors and patrons Subject: Rhetoric -- History -- 16th century. Chapter 1 charts the traditional association between courts and love, first in the historiography of 'courtly love', and then in historical and sociological accounts of court society. The rhetoric of courtship in Elizabethan language and literature takes this semantic shift as the starting-point for an incisive account of the practice and meanings of courtship at the court of Elizabeth I, a place where 'being at court' pre-eminently came to mean the same as 'wooing' the Queen.

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